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A notice about John Blumer's death, can be seen here (PERSONAL, 85% down), & also here. The company failed during the shipbuilding slump that followed WW1, after completing Ixia in Jul. It would seem to have built 258 vessels in its lifetime at North Dock, the last such vessel, Cydonia, a cargo ship of 3517 tons, being on the stocks for 4 years, & finally launched on Dec. Ray Ranns has kindly provided a newspaper cutting which advises that on Feb. John Blumer & Company Limited, be voluntarily wound up & its assets distributed. You are invited to visit this page for some general data about 'Blumer'.

And next a splendid image, taken at Blumers in the early 1900s, shown here thanks to the kindness of Malcolm Fraser of Durham City.

John Blumer retired from the business on December 31, 1895. I have not read the circumstances but do we have a hint.

The partnership which existed prior to that date, the partnership of Arthur Robson & John Blumer, styled 'John Blumer and Co.' was then dissolved. The 1883/84 edition of 'Lloyd's' notes the vessel to be 'missing'. Thanks to Sheila Buttinger we now know a little more. (Thomas) Gilhespie was reported dead at sea in 1883 - drowned as a result of the total wreck, on Jan. While en route from Seaham to Devonport with Ralph Davison, of Crofton Mills, Blyth, Northumberland, in command.

The page in 'Where Ships Are Born' states that John commenced a shipbuilding business at North Sands in 1859. 2017, this splendid watch was available for purchase. 1 indicates that an image of a brig (I presume that 'bg' means brig) of the name is available in Australia. ) that his great grandfather George Miller ('Miller') was the ship's master. From 1874/75 to 1885/86 as per the Lloyd's data now made available at left, though 'Wood' would seem to have been the vessel's Master for a short time to 1885/86 when Miller took over command again.

That date may well be incorrect, however, since this fine page, dating from 1891, references him (about 30% down) as being a builder at that location nine years earlier, in 1850, when John was just 18 years old only. The chain is 9 caret & weighs 80 grams, and the watch case is 18 caret and weighs 48 grams. Lloyd's Register of 1861/62 states that the vessel was built by Pace. The builder was 'Pace', with no reference to 'Blumer'.

Luke Blumer's (1) third son was William Blumer (1789/1850) and it is William's son John Blumer (1832/1913) who commenced shipbuilding in Sunderland. From 1876/77, the vessel was registered at Shields. Dixon' became the vessel's owners, also of Shields.

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John Blumer moved his shipbuilding business to the north end of North Dock. John Blumer was a most religious man, it would appear, & was a pillar of the Non Conformist Church, which flourished in the industrial towns as a reaction to poverty & the evils of drink. you might contact the webmaster who will gladly put you in contact with its owner. Vessel was out of Hull (or Aberdeen), when on May 16, 1869, with i) Captain W. The sinking of Zetus, swiftly broken up by the mountainous waves, was witnessed by 'Donald', mate of Margaret, which vessel suffered the same fate, Donald being the sole survivor.

Now this page, indeed the whole site, focuses on Sunderland & its shipbuilders. But you should also know that the Blumer family was involved in shipbuilding in nearby Hartlepool. Denis Wederell of New Zealand ('NZ'), indicated in 2001 that Star of Peace traded from Blyth to Lisbon, Portugal & onwards to Central America & Brazil, but visited Australia in 1879.

Luke Blumer (1793/1873) (2), a prominent citizen of Hartlepool indeed, commenced a shipbuilding business entitled 'Luke Blumer & Son' (1) in Hartlepool in 1848 with his son George Blumer (1817/1867). The vessel rescued the crew of a sinking Belgian ship (name not stated) in 1878; an oil painting of scene by Henry Loos (commissioned by the Belgian government), exists; vessel then captained by William Heatley. Data essentially confirmed by Bill Heatley who adds that a voyage to Australia or NZ was 'not typical'.

I should add that the fine New Zealand based 'Miramar' site ('search by shipbuilder' link & type in 'Blumer') indicates the following business names that were also used i) 'Pace, Blumer', ii) 'Haswell & Blumer' & iii) 'J. I am not sure at what periods in time such names were in actual use. Much of above data originated with Mori Flapan of Sydney, Australia (thanks again!

However, the 'Pace' of 'Pace, Blumer' refers to Robert Pace, a shipwright who was foreman for George Booth.